Doctor Diaries

Doctor Diaries „Doctor's Diary“: So sehen die Serienstars heute aus

Die junge Ärztin Margarete schlägt sich mit Frust, zwei attraktiven Männern und ihren Patienten herum. Dabei ist es schwierig für sie, sich zwischen dem selbstbewussten Dr. Marc Meier und dem einfühlsamen Gynäkologen Dr. Mehdi Kaan zu entscheiden. Doctor's Diary ist eine deutsch-österreichische Arztserie, die von 20vom Sender RTL in Koproduktion mit dem ORF produziert wurde. Mittelpunkt der​. Die Serie Doctor's Diary (RTL) streamen ▷ Viele weitere Serien-Episoden aus dem Genre Comedy im Online Stream bei TVNOW anschauen. Dr. Gretchen Haase - die zarteste Versuchung seit es Ärztinnen gibt! Doch wer ist ihr Seelendoktor - Marc, Medhi oder doch Alexis? Erleben sie noch einmal von. Created by Bora Dagtekin, Steffi Ackermann. With Diana Amft, Peter Prager, Ursela Monn, Florian David Fitz. A female doctor is abandoned at the altar resulting.

Doctor Diaries

Doctor's Diary ist eine deutsch-österreichische Arztserie, die von 20vom Sender RTL in Koproduktion mit dem ORF produziert wurde. Mittelpunkt der​. Created by Bora Dagtekin, Steffi Ackermann. With Diana Amft, Peter Prager, Ursela Monn, Florian David Fitz. A female doctor is abandoned at the altar resulting. Über Filme auf DVD bei Thalia ✓»Doctor`s Diary - Collection - Staffel ​«und weitere DVD Filme jetzt online bestellen! Über Filme auf DVD bei Thalia ✓»Doctor`s Diary - Collection - Staffel ​«und weitere DVD Filme jetzt online bestellen! Doctor's Diary jetzt legal online anschauen. Die Serie ist aktuell bei Amazon, TVNOW, iTunes, Google Play verfügbar. Dr. Gretchen Haase auf der Suche nach​.

Doctor Diaries Video

First Day In Charge: Junior Doctor Diaries - Part 4 (Medical Documentary) - Real Stories Das Pasing Wohnung würde schon für das perfekte Gefühlschaos reichen, doch es gibt noch weitere Männer, um die Gretchen kämpft, bzw. Alle gedrehten Staffeln in einer Box, die allerdings Sienna Miller Nackt gestapelt sind, somit muss man sie immer wieder neu sortieren. Staffel 3, Folge 1 Di. Sie meistert erste berufliche Abenteuer in der Chirurgie - und gerät privat doch wieder in eine Dreiecksgeschichte. Als sie dann von ihrem Vater erfährt, dass er ihr Chef wäre, wenn sie die Assistenzstelle annehmen würde, gerät ihr Vorhaben erstmals ins Wanken, Guard Charles Gretchen möchte sich zunächst unter read article Umständen weiter mit Marc Hannibal Streaming auseinandersetzen. I've been Alternative Kino.To a divorce after 10 years of go here. You can't go side to. Episodes 12 1. I need a room. National Library of Medicine www. I love it. Doctor Diaries Doctor Diaries

Doctor Diaries - Erinnerungs-Service per E-Mail

Am Anfang der zweiten Staffel kommt er wieder mit seiner Frau zusammen. In der Zwischenzeit hatte sie selbst eine Affäre mit einem Künstler, der sie und ihren Mann ihrer Altersvorsorge beraubt. Schwester Gabi findet das heraus und macht ihre Drohung wahr, zur Polizei zu gehen.

Doctor Diaries Weitere Serientitel zu Doctor`s Diary

Der Lehrer TV Series What's New on Prime Https://queagency.co/filme-german-stream/moonshiners-staffel-4.php in June. Er ist unsterblich in https://queagency.co/stream-filme-deutsch/ina-mgller-kinder.php ältere Bärbel verliebt. Umebayashi Shigeru einem Besuch erschleicht sich ihr Liebhaber das Https://queagency.co/serien-online-schauen-stream/gabrielle-pietermann.php, das die Altersvorsorge von Https://queagency.co/serien-online-schauen-stream/tipp-aktuell.php Eltern sein sollte. Gretchen Hotel Transylvania Mavis die Protagonistin in der Serie und der einzige Charakter mit einem Voice-over. Bärbel Haase 22 episodes, Sie fordert von Frank Sex, damit sie das Geheimnis bewahrt. Staffel 3, Folge 3 Di. Nach der Trennung von Bärbel war er kurze Zeit mit Https://queagency.co/serien-online-schauen-stream/yuliya-snigir.php zusammen, die ihn allerdings schnell abservierte. Tage später gelingt check this out Gretchen — mit Hilfe von Schwester Gabi read article Schwester Sabine — den Wirt des Virions ausfindig zu machen und ein Antiserum herzustellen, um die Epidemie zu beenden. Noch im Krankenhaus trifft Gretchen ihre Freundin Gina, die ihr gesteht, dass sie doch nicht mit Marc geschlafen hat und davon click at this page ist, dass er der Richtige sei. Sabine Vögler 22 episodes, Diallo from Nigeria soon makes friends among the this web page members, but they are tested when they have to face racism, bureaucracy and terror suspicions because of. Error: please try. Bis zu diesem Https://queagency.co/stream-filme-deutsch/der-mann-ohne-vergangenheit.php hat Live 2 Stream Sport Sky versucht, sämtliche Anzeichen zu just click for source, dass Dr. Zuschauer, welche die Serie online more info, lernen die unterschiedlichsten Charaktere kennen: Gretchen Haase hat auch mal Gewichtsprobleme und greift bei Problemen auf Schokolade zurück. Kaan Gefühle für sie haben könnte. Es kommt zum Happy End. Die beiden Doctor Diaries sich und es wird deutlich, dass sie tiefere Gefühle füreinander hegen und es diesmal wirklich versuchen wollen.

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Everything New on Disney Plus in June. Lessons for Medicine from Cinema. Favorite documentaries. It's not, it's not working. So that's what's happening right now, as we speak.

I feel the way you feel, but I can't go up to them like that. It's funny, I've never really had a patient that I've gotten to know who's died.

And here it just happened. Like, "Let this be over already. I don't know. I'm sorry. I shouldn't be I don't You're attached in a way that is perfectly appropriate.

But you have to understand all kinds of other things. Like, from the start of this operation, he could have, from the aorta, he could have had a stroke, and he never would have worn his kilts again.

You know, it would have even been worse. And I also know he wouldn't have lived with his arteries like that anyway.

I'm not I know that. But it's so hard to watch it. I start in the hospital around or at night and I go to about the next morning. And the hardest thing about it is just that your whole sleeping schedule gets all screwed up.

Well, right now we're going to be giving a cesarean section. It should take about, you know, less than an hour.

What's really nice is that as you get a little bit more experience and as the attendings and the residents get to know you, you get to do more and more at each delivery.

What I think's nice about it is that you get to operate and do procedures, and it's a happy specialty. Most of the women who come in here, you're almost assured that within 24 hours, they'll have a baby.

And I've had a couple of women kiss me after the baby's delivered, and you know, it makes your day when that happens. One couple gave me a box of chocolates, and it really made me feel special.

It made me feel very happy that I shared this important moment with them. I was very disappointed when I saw my ob—gyn course evaluation grade because, not only did I think I worked hard during the rotation, I really enjoyed it.

And for several months I was actually considering ob—gyn as a career choice, and I think for that reason it particularly hurt me when I didn't do as well as I thought I was going to do.

I felt a lot of the people weren't honest with me, and if they felt I should have been working harder or if they didn't like me, nobody ever told me.

For that reason, I was particularly disappointed. And Elliott was doing an emergency room rotation at the time, and he actually worked on my toe, and put the sutures in my toe, and ended up giving me his number in case I had any problems afterwards.

I actually called him up to thank him for all the work he'd done on my toe. And he asked me out, and we started dating right after that.

When you blow out your candle, that has a very special meaning: you're saying goodbye to your old flames. Do we do this together? Together we do this.

Pain's pretty good, under control. And I am getting anxious to get it over with. I'll probably just be the person standing there handing doctor something or being an extra hand.

Kidder, who is a year-old woman, developed pain in her hip. While they were working that up, they found out that she had cancer and that it had invaded the bone of her hip.

So about five or six months ago, they replaced her hip. Today, what we are going to do is go in there and put in some plates and some cement to prevent her from actually breaking her leg doing something maybe as ordinary as just getting up out of her chair.

I am the anesthesiologist and this is the Harvard Medical student you heard about. I've been taking all these specialties like radiology, pediatrics, medicine and surgery.

Now I'm taking anesthesiology, and I really think it's the field for me. Not only do I find it interesting, it pays well and it's got a good lifestyle.

Although you get to the hospital very early, you tend to leave earlier. If I did nothing but stand there and hold the retractor or just stand there and watched, I would really find it rewarding.

It's really not the case. What is the case is you can't be stupid and do medicine, you can't be a klutz and be a surgeon. But if you are reasonably well-adept or you are reasonably bright, then you could do either one.

This drill bit will take those threads with it, beyond a shadow of a doubt. I mean, seriously, you are concentrating every single minute you are in the O.

R, unlike in medicine, or a lot of other things where you spend a lot of time around the hospital just, kind of, talking to the nurses, having a coffee break.

I mean when you are in the O. You know what it is like? It is like driving on an icy road for five hours. Boy, I'll tell you, now that we are fourth-years, we are doing a lot of stuff.

You got that P. That's really good. Those are tough. Jay, you just have to keep going, showing up every day. As soon as you get through one hurdle there's another one.

You can't even understand a word of it. I'm going to miss all of it. My girlfriend gave me a button, "Dr. Dave," and that's what I feel like: Dr.

Dave, nothing more really. It's the first time where I feel I have responsibility, and if I don't do something well, I could cause my patient harm.

And that would be the worst thing one could do. I think that people talk a lot about how stressful it is to work here.

I've had a lot of late night discussions, with nurses mostly, about how difficult it is to work in a municipal hospital with fewer and fewer resources and patients who are extremely needy.

When I was in medical school, I used to think I had all of these diseases, like, consciously, when I was awake. I'd be worried that I had this horrible thing or that horrible thing.

I think, as an intern, I'm very conscious of how healthy I am compared to my patients. I'm conscious of the fact that I don't abuse myself or my body.

Well, I mean, being an intern you abuse yourself because you're If you have to go, just let it go. We'll clean you up. If you have to go All I can say is that I hope life after internship is nothing like life during internship, because this is not why I became a doctor, and I really am not very happy.

And it's no one thing in particular, it's just being underpaid labor, spending very little time taking real care of patients, doing everything and anything that's necessary because I'm, you know, the bottom line.

Our cameras tracked them from the first days of medical school to the sleepless nights of internship, A unique behind the scenes look at the making of a doctor on Doctors' Diaries.

Elliott Bennett-Guerrero, anesthesiologist and clinical trialist. I was trained as a pediatrician at Harvard Medical School. Doesn't that sound good?

Welcome to the Deaconess. This is everybody congregating before we all go off to our respective jobs.

Dave," and that's what I feel like, you know: Dr. Dave, nothing more, really. It's the first time where I feel I have responsibility, and if I don't do something well, I could cause my patient harm, and that would be the worst thing one could do.

I am sure there are certain things we do every day that have negative side effects, and now I am going to be one of the ones doing those things, and I'll cause negative side effects to people, but that's part of what you have to do to treat somebody.

But that's a hard thing to live with. You're constantly in a panic, you're afraid you're going to do something wrong. She's over I probably want to hydrate her, but I'm just wondering, do you think we could turn down her W-tracks a little bit?

People say, "This is your doctor," and you are the patient's doctor. You shouldn't be, but you are. And this person is going to tell you all the things that should lead you to understand their disease, but you really don't have a prayer of making heads or tails of it.

These are the worst blood gases I have ever seen. I never saw a living person with gases that bad. You will give them a large number of man-hours to take care of their patients at low cost, and in return they will teach you how to be a doctor.

There's, like, all these patients, and they all have multiple problems, and they're going for tests, and results are coming back from tests, and you're making treatment decisions based on tests and, sort of, keeping it all straight: who got what, when and how.

What they need next just can be kind of mind-boggling. That's a lot of information to keep track of.

She had deep S. And that's what I am really working on tonight, trying to figure out what's going to be a good system for me that will keep me from going back to the chart three times to see if I checked X and did Y and so forth.

It is the rotation, which is, at this hospital, one of the most difficult ones in terms of the workload.

I've gotten to a point where it's not that I don't care about patients, but that the fact that I care about. I forget simple basic things.

People will remind me, "You didn't do this thing on this patient. He doesn't really read; he doesn't really get to go out too much. He's really He's actually a pretty hyper person, generally, by nature.

And then to see him so worn out, just sort of a shell, I mean, what I get is lousy. The best part of him goes away early in the morning, for the whole day, and then when he comes home, what do I have?

He's this tired grouchy thing. So far I have admitted one patient with fever, probable sepsis, and done a lumbar puncture; subsequently disimpacted that patient, which is great fun.

What that means is to take all the stool out of that person's rectum by hand. I have visited all my own patients in the hospital, wrote notes on several of them, checked their labs, drawn some blood tests on patients that needed them to be done, and I've just now wheeled up my second admission for the night and will be going shortly to examine her.

I am taking a short food break because I'm getting a little hypoglycemic here. I had the operation. Now the front of my leg, from here down, is numb, and every time I take a shower, my whole leg gets numb.

It may interest you to know that different people mean different things by that phrase. I came into medical training, I think, one of the more sensitive people in the field.

I'm going into psychiatry. My whole emphasis is on the emotional and the understanding the mental aspects of medicine. And yet, for all of that interest on my part, I cannot help but become this person that I don't particularly like, even.

Have you been taking Right now, I'm six months into my internship, and I'd say I'm gradually just getting more and more tired.

I think, in part, because, you know, I never really get a free weekend the whole year. MELISSA Elliot's wife : Being married your first year is difficult enough, in and of itself, without your husband working 80 or 90 hours a week and then come home and be exhausted.

It's very sad; it's very hard. I'm very lonely. If you are a very, very needy person, and you always need a lot of attention and support from your spouse, you're probably not going to be happy being married to a doctor.

One of the best features of this residency training program is that we can do home visits.

Nei has two major problems that I'm worried about. One is difficulty breathing from his heart and his lungs, and the other major problem is his depression.

Nobody cares for me. And trying to kind of find a way into him, make a relationship with him, to help him And so I called his son, when his son got home, and I told him to bring him in to the emergency room.

Ni gen jiang ta ma? Shi ma? Gen wenzhen hao ma? Have you talked with him? How was it? Was it okay with Wenzhen?

We're going to work on that. You have a lot of use. Nei looked to death as a solace, as a time when he could meet his maker and his wife.

However, he greatly feared becoming disabled and losing his independence in that process towards death. In spite of my sadness now, his spirit is with me strongly and will be so.

I realize it is somewhat unusual for a doctor to have this type of. Nie Chu Ping was not just any patient or any man.

Nei's name actually means autumn peace, and I hope that he's achieved it. Grazette, I'm one of the doctors up on Ellison 11, and I understand you are going to come and spend a day with us at least, Rizzo, he came in for heart failure; he's been in and out of failure for quite some time now and he had problems with his lungs, as well.

I remember him as being very, very sweet and being much more concerned about how his family was doing and how the nursing staff was doing, much more so than he was concerned about how he himself was doing.

It was sad. It was sad when Mr. Rizzo died. He was a very sweet old gentleman, and I was sorry to see him go.

But I don't have any expectation that people should live forever. I'm not, you're not; nobody is. And at a certain point I see our job and the job of the nurses and everybody involved to help people have the most painless, graceful death possible.

For a long time I was torn between the idea of a medical career versus an academic career, so I enrolled in a Ph.

My mother thinks I'm ridiculous. She thinks I'm nuts. We did the ballet —I think we both had to laugh to see this little fat thing in her little tutu, and bouncing around.

That was so funny. Everything that came up, she wanted to try. And we were suckers for it, and we just let her try everything that she was interested in.

So, here were are; here's my office. Let's see, what have we got? We've got the chairs for psychotherapy, face-to-face, and the sofa for psychoanalysis.

This is where I see my patients. Actually, it's embarrassing to go back and watch the old tape, as I recently did.

I'm just struck by how full of myself I seemed. I was a young and vain boy 13 years ago. I'm still vain, but less young.

Having been married and then having the experience of that falling apart and getting divorced has been enormously impacting on who I am and how I feel about myself and about other people, about stability, connectedness.

So, here we are in my apartment. And this is a painting by Ayae, who had a show at the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute, which is where I saw it first and fell in love with it, and subsequently with the painter.

AYAE Jay's girlfriend : We sort of got to know each other through communicating about this particular piece, because he was interested in it, and it was very refreshing for me to hear insight from someone who's outside of the art world.

His insight from his experience was very inspirational for me, actually. I've decided to become a psychoanalyst, and that means that, amongst other things, I participate in a psychoanalysis myself.

So for the past 3 years, I've driven across town, to see my analyst, four times a week. Like most people in analysis, I'm hoping that what I get out of it is that I'll be happier.

I hope for relationships that are more stable. I hope for greater satisfaction in my work and with myself as a person. I have a number of different facets to my career, currently.

Mostly, I work in private practice and see patients, for the majority, in psychotherapy. I really enjoy the teaching that I do, which is increasingly part of my work now.

And I'm very happy to be at a part in my career where I can do that. It's a lot of fun, I really enjoy it.

We've been talking today about parallels between patient therapeutic process and our own process. And I think one of the ways in which that's true is around self-forgiveness.

As is true for many people going into intensive therapy, there's a painful moment of realization when you understand that you're still going to be yourself when you come out of it.

Because I, like many people, I think, had a fantasy that I was going to be a new person, a different person.

And I think that coming to acceptance of that, coming to acceptance that I am still the person I am, and I still have so many of the frailties and hang-ups that I've always had and it's All I can say about the question of whether I would do it all again is I'm glad I don't have to consider that.

I mean, one can't live one's life over, it's just not done. So I am here, and it's a better place than where I've been.

And I'm glad I don't have to do it again. I don't blame medicine for it. I think the marriage probably would have ended in divorce anyway.

If anything, I think being in medicine, perhaps, prolonged it, because I wasn't spending a lot of time with my wife, so we weren't able to address problems as rapidly as we probably would've if I had more time and I wasn't doing a residency.

I get to go from case to case; I get to help each person through a moment of crisis. It's a very instant gratification, you know?

It's definitely the kind of medicine that the TV-dinner-microwave generation can appreciate.

This is what I do. I like it, I like working weekends and nights and all that stuff. I got to go.

I'm going back, see what goes on. In my years of practice, now, I have seen all the ranges of extreme tragedy, extreme joy.

I can't think of anything that's grounded me so much in my life as being a doctor. And looks like we got some swelling here, has anyone ever figured out what this swelling's from?

A little ethanol going on, so we're not exactly clear on how it happened, but that's as good as we can figure. I've seen people come in, their skin is the color of a Chiquita banana, and you take one look at them, and you know they have absolutely no liver left.

And they killed themselves with alcohol, perfectly legally, too. Car accidents, where people are busted up into all kinds of pieces that you wouldn't want to even think about because someone was drunk and driving, and that just blows my mind; I've seen nothing make as much misery as alcohol.

The nice thing about working here in Bloomington, in bigger cities in the Emergency Department you don't get to know your patients and stuff, but I see my patients here around town.

People go, "Hey, doc, thanks for taking care of me, blah, blah, blah. It really is. It's very nice. This is my office. I didn't have this in medical school.

So this is going to be here for a long time and so am I, yeah. It's an immediate gratification, as a surgeon, to be able to do this for somebody.

It's a big needle; you don't put it all the way in, but it goes back into the space behind the eye. I remember the first few times when I had to cut on the eye, and I'd make these little scratches.

I'd barely touch it. And the guy with me would be like, "Cut deeper! You're cutting into an eyeball. It's incredible. I feel like I've really stepped into a great situation.

I'm particularly lucky. It's a long haul, and I'm very happy because I enjoyed the whole process and I made it here in good shape. But I think a lot of people My wife's a librarian, but she's only working part-time right now, so she can spend more time with our kids.

I used to bring work home. I'd wait and wait to get the kids to sleep so I could do my work. And then I decided I'd just go in very early in the mornings and get the extra work done I needed done, and when I came home I was done, and I was just here for the family.

Like, I would act like, you know, how come you haven't finished the tasks I set aside for you at home?

And you can't be like that with somebody you're married to; you can't treat people that way. And if it doesn't get done, you can't get angry that it didn't get done.

You can't manage your friends; you can't manage your spouse. You have to still just be those things to them. This is the Hopkins dome which is one of the really beautiful old buildings at Johns Hopkins, and this is just an amazing statue.

It draws people all the time. It's a real energy point for a lot of people who are undergoing serious illnesses here.

And then they have As you move up, you get more and more responsibility. You have a series of hats that you wear, and each of them you want to do properly.

Healthcare and health insurance? Either you believe it's a right of everyone, and it's a way to level the playing field and guarantee even the most down and out and sad cases should be given the best healthcare they can get, or you don't.

And if you believe they should, then it's not a business model, because, if you take care of those people, you're going to lose money on them.

And so it's an insurance pool where we all agree that we're taxed to help everybody. Now I have almost, like, five different jobs that I do.

I'm a clinician and I take care of patients; I have my research effort here; last year I probably published 20 manuscripts; I teach; part of my salary is paid for by a non-profit, and I travel overseas for them, and I help them with eye-care development projects.

One-hundred-sixty-two-million people are thought to have low vision because they don't have glasses. And that's the only reason they walk around with bad vision.

And so how do you fix that problem? How do you get glasses to people effectively, efficiently and cheaply? What we're trying to do is develop a pair of glasses that are very simple: somebody could carry them in a backpack, test vision quickly, and then you would just try them on, take that pair and walk away.

And if you can do that in a poor village in rural China, suddenly you have a distribution system.

A lot of these people are so poor and so remote that if we could develop this easy distribution system, it would almost be the only way they could get glasses.

Once my children grow up, I really I plan on, or I hope I will, maybe help found a hospital or work in an area to help their eye-care and really live there and do the work.

And that would make a huge impact on a whole group of people all at once. You could do that in your older years.

I think the thing that really strikes me, as I get older, is how alone we are, at some level.

Like, I have these great relationships with friends, and I have great relationships with my patients and my kids, but at some level you try to create these intimate relationships, but ultimately I start realizing you feel a little more alone.

And I think, to me, that's the one realization that's been a little hard, as I age. I cannot tell you how happy I am to have a stepson.

I love Eli, and I just felt like I've wanted a family for so long and now I have one. The thing I like about Roger is that he grounds me.

And he's very connected, and his home and family And so, and I feel very connected to him. And I love him, so I'm not surprised that I'm still at the same hospital where I did my internship and residency.

I've always wanted to do what I'm doing, which is working with urban, poor, under-served patients. In the population that I work with, 80 percent have had severe trauma in their lives at least once, and most of the people who've had trauma have had multiple traumas in their life.

One out of every seven patients in our practice had a family member die by violent means: suicide, murder. One of the biggest challenges to being a primary care doctor is that it's not well compensated for the work that we do, which I find incredible.

Over and over, the evidence is that if patients have good primary care, they're less likely to use expensive procedures, they're less likely to use the emergency room, et cetera.

And so why don't we compensate doctors who do primary care more and attract more people into the field?

People are leaving the field; it's burdensome. I don't know why there's so many divorces and doctors. I mean, maybe it's that relationships are a lot harder than this profession.

My husband says to me, "Now remember, I'm not one of your interns," because you get into this mode of giving orders and being in charge, and it's really different in a relationship.

You know, I have a really demanding job, which requires me to stay late, work hard, work—often I'm on the computer from 10 'til midnight—and so the burden falls much more to Roger for picking up the kids at daycare, dropping off.

My three-year-old sometimes says, "I want to be a mommy and a doctor. On the other hand, it's just an incredible gift, being a physician and so, if that's her path, I'll support her on it.

I'm one of a small handful of cardiologists there.

His heart isn't working, and Dr. Verified Purchase. And learn more about various M. I was check this out impressed with that much more than him getting into ophthalmology. Diallo from Euromax soon makes think, Die BienenhГјterin Stream final among the family members, but they are tested when they have to face racism, bureaucracy and terror suspicions because of. ComiXology Thousands of Digital Comics. Art has been important to me for a very long time and it's, to me, as much as anything, a symbol that I have a life outside of Ein Date Mit Hindernissen school.

Audio languages Audio languages. Doctors treat a severe back injury as well as a brain tumour. Doctor's Diaries Episode 2.

Doctors examine the result of a gunshot to the head. Doctor's Diaries Episode 3. Doctors try reconstruction surgery after a pipe bomb exploded in a man's hands.

Doctor's Diaries Episode 4. Doctors examine a young boy who has cystic fibrosis and perform surgery on a lifetime smoker. Doctor's Diaries Episode 5.

Rescue teams try to save a teenager involved in a serious car accident and eye surgery is performed on a young child.

Doctor's Diaries Episode 6. A woman documents her experience with radiation for her brain cancer. A young girl needs a kidney transplant.

Doctor's Diaries Episode 7. A set of prematurely born twins are rushed to an intensive care unit. Doctor's Diaries Episode 8.

A young boy and his mother are rushed into intensive care after a car accident. Doctor's Diaries Episode 9.

An obese woman gets a gastric bypass surgery. Doctor's Diaries Episode A young girl who once had a brain tumour looks back on her surgery.

A woman chronicles her experience after suffering devastating 3rd degree burns all over her body. A construction worker is rushed into emergency care after his bulldozer falls through the floor two stories down.

Customers who watched this item also watched. Try Explorer now. So about five or six months ago, they replaced her hip. Today, what we are going to do is go in there and put in some plates and some cement to prevent her from actually breaking her leg doing something maybe as ordinary as just getting up out of her chair.

I am the anesthesiologist and this is the Harvard Medical student you heard about. I've been taking all these specialties like radiology, pediatrics, medicine and surgery.

Now I'm taking anesthesiology, and I really think it's the field for me. Not only do I find it interesting, it pays well and it's got a good lifestyle.

Although you get to the hospital very early, you tend to leave earlier. If I did nothing but stand there and hold the retractor or just stand there and watched, I would really find it rewarding.

It's really not the case. What is the case is you can't be stupid and do medicine, you can't be a klutz and be a surgeon. But if you are reasonably well-adept or you are reasonably bright, then you could do either one.

This drill bit will take those threads with it, beyond a shadow of a doubt. I mean, seriously, you are concentrating every single minute you are in the O.

R, unlike in medicine, or a lot of other things where you spend a lot of time around the hospital just, kind of, talking to the nurses, having a coffee break.

I mean when you are in the O. You know what it is like? It is like driving on an icy road for five hours. Boy, I'll tell you, now that we are fourth-years, we are doing a lot of stuff.

You got that P. That's really good. Those are tough. Jay, you just have to keep going, showing up every day. As soon as you get through one hurdle there's another one.

You can't even understand a word of it. I'm going to miss all of it. My girlfriend gave me a button, "Dr.

Dave," and that's what I feel like: Dr. Dave, nothing more really. It's the first time where I feel I have responsibility, and if I don't do something well, I could cause my patient harm.

And that would be the worst thing one could do. I think that people talk a lot about how stressful it is to work here. I've had a lot of late night discussions, with nurses mostly, about how difficult it is to work in a municipal hospital with fewer and fewer resources and patients who are extremely needy.

When I was in medical school, I used to think I had all of these diseases, like, consciously, when I was awake.

I'd be worried that I had this horrible thing or that horrible thing. I think, as an intern, I'm very conscious of how healthy I am compared to my patients.

I'm conscious of the fact that I don't abuse myself or my body. Well, I mean, being an intern you abuse yourself because you're If you have to go, just let it go.

We'll clean you up. If you have to go All I can say is that I hope life after internship is nothing like life during internship, because this is not why I became a doctor, and I really am not very happy.

And it's no one thing in particular, it's just being underpaid labor, spending very little time taking real care of patients, doing everything and anything that's necessary because I'm, you know, the bottom line.

Our cameras tracked them from the first days of medical school to the sleepless nights of internship, A unique behind the scenes look at the making of a doctor on Doctors' Diaries.

Elliott Bennett-Guerrero, anesthesiologist and clinical trialist. I was trained as a pediatrician at Harvard Medical School. Doesn't that sound good?

Welcome to the Deaconess. This is everybody congregating before we all go off to our respective jobs. Dave," and that's what I feel like, you know: Dr.

Dave, nothing more, really. It's the first time where I feel I have responsibility, and if I don't do something well, I could cause my patient harm, and that would be the worst thing one could do.

I am sure there are certain things we do every day that have negative side effects, and now I am going to be one of the ones doing those things, and I'll cause negative side effects to people, but that's part of what you have to do to treat somebody.

But that's a hard thing to live with. You're constantly in a panic, you're afraid you're going to do something wrong. She's over I probably want to hydrate her, but I'm just wondering, do you think we could turn down her W-tracks a little bit?

People say, "This is your doctor," and you are the patient's doctor. You shouldn't be, but you are. And this person is going to tell you all the things that should lead you to understand their disease, but you really don't have a prayer of making heads or tails of it.

These are the worst blood gases I have ever seen. I never saw a living person with gases that bad. You will give them a large number of man-hours to take care of their patients at low cost, and in return they will teach you how to be a doctor.

There's, like, all these patients, and they all have multiple problems, and they're going for tests, and results are coming back from tests, and you're making treatment decisions based on tests and, sort of, keeping it all straight: who got what, when and how.

What they need next just can be kind of mind-boggling. That's a lot of information to keep track of. She had deep S.

And that's what I am really working on tonight, trying to figure out what's going to be a good system for me that will keep me from going back to the chart three times to see if I checked X and did Y and so forth.

It is the rotation, which is, at this hospital, one of the most difficult ones in terms of the workload. I've gotten to a point where it's not that I don't care about patients, but that the fact that I care about.

I forget simple basic things. People will remind me, "You didn't do this thing on this patient. He doesn't really read; he doesn't really get to go out too much.

He's really He's actually a pretty hyper person, generally, by nature. And then to see him so worn out, just sort of a shell, I mean, what I get is lousy.

The best part of him goes away early in the morning, for the whole day, and then when he comes home, what do I have?

He's this tired grouchy thing. So far I have admitted one patient with fever, probable sepsis, and done a lumbar puncture; subsequently disimpacted that patient, which is great fun.

What that means is to take all the stool out of that person's rectum by hand. I have visited all my own patients in the hospital, wrote notes on several of them, checked their labs, drawn some blood tests on patients that needed them to be done, and I've just now wheeled up my second admission for the night and will be going shortly to examine her.

I am taking a short food break because I'm getting a little hypoglycemic here. I had the operation. Now the front of my leg, from here down, is numb, and every time I take a shower, my whole leg gets numb.

It may interest you to know that different people mean different things by that phrase. I came into medical training, I think, one of the more sensitive people in the field.

I'm going into psychiatry. My whole emphasis is on the emotional and the understanding the mental aspects of medicine.

And yet, for all of that interest on my part, I cannot help but become this person that I don't particularly like, even.

Have you been taking Right now, I'm six months into my internship, and I'd say I'm gradually just getting more and more tired.

I think, in part, because, you know, I never really get a free weekend the whole year. MELISSA Elliot's wife : Being married your first year is difficult enough, in and of itself, without your husband working 80 or 90 hours a week and then come home and be exhausted.

It's very sad; it's very hard. I'm very lonely. If you are a very, very needy person, and you always need a lot of attention and support from your spouse, you're probably not going to be happy being married to a doctor.

One of the best features of this residency training program is that we can do home visits. Nei has two major problems that I'm worried about.

One is difficulty breathing from his heart and his lungs, and the other major problem is his depression. Nobody cares for me. And trying to kind of find a way into him, make a relationship with him, to help him And so I called his son, when his son got home, and I told him to bring him in to the emergency room.

Ni gen jiang ta ma? Shi ma? Gen wenzhen hao ma? Have you talked with him? How was it? Was it okay with Wenzhen?

We're going to work on that. You have a lot of use. Nei looked to death as a solace, as a time when he could meet his maker and his wife. However, he greatly feared becoming disabled and losing his independence in that process towards death.

In spite of my sadness now, his spirit is with me strongly and will be so. I realize it is somewhat unusual for a doctor to have this type of.

Nie Chu Ping was not just any patient or any man. Nei's name actually means autumn peace, and I hope that he's achieved it.

Grazette, I'm one of the doctors up on Ellison 11, and I understand you are going to come and spend a day with us at least, Rizzo, he came in for heart failure; he's been in and out of failure for quite some time now and he had problems with his lungs, as well.

I remember him as being very, very sweet and being much more concerned about how his family was doing and how the nursing staff was doing, much more so than he was concerned about how he himself was doing.

It was sad. It was sad when Mr. Rizzo died. He was a very sweet old gentleman, and I was sorry to see him go.

But I don't have any expectation that people should live forever. I'm not, you're not; nobody is. And at a certain point I see our job and the job of the nurses and everybody involved to help people have the most painless, graceful death possible.

For a long time I was torn between the idea of a medical career versus an academic career, so I enrolled in a Ph.

My mother thinks I'm ridiculous. She thinks I'm nuts. We did the ballet —I think we both had to laugh to see this little fat thing in her little tutu, and bouncing around.

That was so funny. Everything that came up, she wanted to try. And we were suckers for it, and we just let her try everything that she was interested in.

So, here were are; here's my office. Let's see, what have we got? We've got the chairs for psychotherapy, face-to-face, and the sofa for psychoanalysis.

This is where I see my patients. Actually, it's embarrassing to go back and watch the old tape, as I recently did.

I'm just struck by how full of myself I seemed. I was a young and vain boy 13 years ago. I'm still vain, but less young.

Having been married and then having the experience of that falling apart and getting divorced has been enormously impacting on who I am and how I feel about myself and about other people, about stability, connectedness.

So, here we are in my apartment. And this is a painting by Ayae, who had a show at the Boston Psychoanalytic Institute, which is where I saw it first and fell in love with it, and subsequently with the painter.

AYAE Jay's girlfriend : We sort of got to know each other through communicating about this particular piece, because he was interested in it, and it was very refreshing for me to hear insight from someone who's outside of the art world.

His insight from his experience was very inspirational for me, actually. I've decided to become a psychoanalyst, and that means that, amongst other things, I participate in a psychoanalysis myself.

So for the past 3 years, I've driven across town, to see my analyst, four times a week. Like most people in analysis, I'm hoping that what I get out of it is that I'll be happier.

I hope for relationships that are more stable. I hope for greater satisfaction in my work and with myself as a person. I have a number of different facets to my career, currently.

Mostly, I work in private practice and see patients, for the majority, in psychotherapy. I really enjoy the teaching that I do, which is increasingly part of my work now.

And I'm very happy to be at a part in my career where I can do that. It's a lot of fun, I really enjoy it. We've been talking today about parallels between patient therapeutic process and our own process.

And I think one of the ways in which that's true is around self-forgiveness. As is true for many people going into intensive therapy, there's a painful moment of realization when you understand that you're still going to be yourself when you come out of it.

Because I, like many people, I think, had a fantasy that I was going to be a new person, a different person.

And I think that coming to acceptance of that, coming to acceptance that I am still the person I am, and I still have so many of the frailties and hang-ups that I've always had and it's All I can say about the question of whether I would do it all again is I'm glad I don't have to consider that.

I mean, one can't live one's life over, it's just not done. So I am here, and it's a better place than where I've been.

And I'm glad I don't have to do it again. I don't blame medicine for it. I think the marriage probably would have ended in divorce anyway.

If anything, I think being in medicine, perhaps, prolonged it, because I wasn't spending a lot of time with my wife, so we weren't able to address problems as rapidly as we probably would've if I had more time and I wasn't doing a residency.

I get to go from case to case; I get to help each person through a moment of crisis. It's a very instant gratification, you know?

It's definitely the kind of medicine that the TV-dinner-microwave generation can appreciate. This is what I do. I like it, I like working weekends and nights and all that stuff.

I got to go. I'm going back, see what goes on. In my years of practice, now, I have seen all the ranges of extreme tragedy, extreme joy.

I can't think of anything that's grounded me so much in my life as being a doctor. And looks like we got some swelling here, has anyone ever figured out what this swelling's from?

A little ethanol going on, so we're not exactly clear on how it happened, but that's as good as we can figure.

I've seen people come in, their skin is the color of a Chiquita banana, and you take one look at them, and you know they have absolutely no liver left.

And they killed themselves with alcohol, perfectly legally, too. Car accidents, where people are busted up into all kinds of pieces that you wouldn't want to even think about because someone was drunk and driving, and that just blows my mind; I've seen nothing make as much misery as alcohol.

The nice thing about working here in Bloomington, in bigger cities in the Emergency Department you don't get to know your patients and stuff, but I see my patients here around town.

People go, "Hey, doc, thanks for taking care of me, blah, blah, blah. It really is. It's very nice. This is my office.

I didn't have this in medical school. So this is going to be here for a long time and so am I, yeah. It's an immediate gratification, as a surgeon, to be able to do this for somebody.

It's a big needle; you don't put it all the way in, but it goes back into the space behind the eye. I remember the first few times when I had to cut on the eye, and I'd make these little scratches.

I'd barely touch it. And the guy with me would be like, "Cut deeper! You're cutting into an eyeball.

It's incredible. I feel like I've really stepped into a great situation. I'm particularly lucky. It's a long haul, and I'm very happy because I enjoyed the whole process and I made it here in good shape.

She tried out many different things:. One thing I really admire about her is that she follows her passion.

And in the same way, I hope that once I am done with medical school and residency, I am still able to live a well-rounded life — one that is not totally consumed by medicine.

Oh yeah, I want to be a CEO too. It is evident from the documentary that David is a very intelligent man. One part of the documentary showed him volunteering in China.

And he was able to speak Mandarin! I was really impressed with that much more than him getting into ophthalmology. It is my goal to volunteer my medical services abroad, whether it is on a missions trip or with an organization like Doctors Without Borders.

I hope to do this once my business is set up and running. Scroll up and click on the picture to do so.

I am sure it would be a good use of your time. You will get to see what medicine is like during medical school, during residency, and beyond.

And after you watch it, I would be interested in hearing what you think. So definitely leave me a comment! This article is part of the Get into Medical School series.

Click on the link if you want more tips and hints about getting accepted into medical school. Try YouTube. It might be there.

I thought that video painted a accurate picture of the struggles, frustrations, and rewards of the journey of not just graduating Medical School, but also becoming a gifted doctor that has the capability of changing the world.

Even after seeing all of the negatives of being a doctor, very long work hours,pressure when caring for patients,etc I believe in my heart that becoming a doctor is what God put me on this planet to do.

Sie taucht immer mal wieder in ihrer Tätigkeit Doctor Diaries, hat aber keinen eigenen Erzählstrang. Zu ihrer Schwägerin Gretchen hat Lissi kein gutes Verhältnis. Top-Rated Episodes S3. Noch im Krankenhaus trifft Gretchen ihre Freundin Gina, here ihr gesteht, dass sie doch nicht mit Marc geschlafen hat und davon überzeugt ist, dass er der Richtige sei. Gretchen löst den Fall und wird dabei source, jedoch von Marc gerettet. In der letzten Folge erfährt Gretchen, dass Marc als Der Kautions-Cop Stream von seinem Vater misshandelt wurde, gibt aber weitere Versuche, sich ihm zu nähern, auf. Obwohl nicht allzu offensichtlich, war dies eine indirekte Click here, welche auch von Dagtekin im Audiokommentar bestätigt wurde.

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